A woman peers over Guánica Dry Forest from the top of Fuerte Capron.

Peering over Guánica Dry Forest from historic Fuerte Caprón.

Visit Guánica's Dry Forest

Hiking to remote beaches, birdwatching, and bike rides.

The Bosque Seco de Guánica, a United Nations International Biosphere Reserve, is one of the most extensive tropical dry coastal forests in the world, totaling around 9,000 acres of land.

Approximately two hours from San Juan and less than half an hour from Ponce, on the southwest side of Puerto Rico, you’ll find an astonishing slice of paradise. Close to the Bahía de Guánica, or Guánica Bay, the forest's arid land is home to hundreds of species of animals and plants, many of which are endangered. The flora is divided into the deciduous, evergreen, and thorny categories, while the coastal zone includes mangroves, among other species adapted to the sand and rocks.

The sound of birdsongs is a regular feature of the park’s peaceful splendor. More than 130 different types of birds have been identified there, among them the guabairo, palometa, and the brown pelican, along with a variety of endemic species. Within the refuge, there are also marine and terrestrial wildlife as well, including reptiles, amphibians, and invertebrates.

Woman walking through the Guánica Dry Forest.

Explore 10,000 acres inhabited by more than 600 types of plants and animals in the Bosque Seco de Guánica.

The Trails

The reserve features 12 different trails to choose from, with varying degrees of difficulty. One of the most popular among locals is also one of the longest (six miles), but the payoff is a historic fort known as Fuerte Caprón. You can admire a fantastic view of the Guánica Bay from the fort, a historic structure first built out of wood by Spaniards in the 16th century and then rebuilt in the 19th century by American forces as a protective fortification.

If you aren’t inclined for that distance, other shorter options are available. The Ballena Trail, close to Tamarindo Beach and Ballena Bay, is an exciting path offering a few breathtaking photo opportunities and a remote beach. Other similar trails include the Cueva Trail, which leads you to the coast and features natural caves along the way.

If you prefer to drive instead of hike, there are roads you can follow that will take you very close to the forest and provide you with a clear view of Guánica’s coast or the Central Mountain Range. If mountain biking is your thing, you can also bring your bicycle.

A cactus in the foreground at Guanica Dry Forest in Puerto Rico.

Guánica Dry Forest is known for its incredible cacti. 

Travel Tips and Recommendations

  • Start your trip at the visitors’ center for information and guidance about choosing a route. You can also park free of charge and find restrooms at this location.
  • Plan accordingly: you’ll need a full day to complete the trip if you are traveling from the metropolitan area of San Juan, spending time in the park, and making it back. You might be better off spending a night nearby and exploring at a leisurely pace. But that’s up to you.  
  • Entrance to the forest is free of charge. It is open daily from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. (or during daylight hours).
  • Bring your sunglasses and hat. Wear sturdy shoes and light clothing. Bring sunscreen and plenty of water so you can be protected against the Caribbean sun and dry environment.
  • A good spray repellent could prove helpful against bug bites.
  • Carry plenty of water and snacks and maintain yourself hydrated at all times.
  • A well-charged cellphone with GPS will help for this trip, so make sure your devices are charged.

Directions and Address

Follow Route 116 until you reach Route 334. Turn toward Bosque Estatal de Guánica, Guánica, PR 00653 | Tel. 787-821-5706

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